Oct 8, 2007

Freehand 2 Wall Colors

Here is a tip when you have 2 wall colors that join either in a corner or anywhere else.

Always cut the light colors first and be sure to cut about 1/4" onto the 2nd color or joining area, in this case - the corner. Obviously dry time is required, then come back and freehand the darker color about 1/16" of an inch onto the 1st color (tan).

By overlapping the tan color in this photo with the dark redish brown, we will achieve a dominant break. If we were to not cut 1/16" into the joining color, the tan color may appear to be more dominant despite its lighter color.

Colors Used
Walls: Behr Dessert Sand and Sherwin Williams SW 6068 Brevity Brown
Trim: New Dirty White
Ceiling: Proform Match

3 comments:

JDMcCann said...

Any tips on getting a nice straight cut line in this scenario?

We do a lot of older properties where corners can be very uneven plaster.

Do not want to use tape for various reasons.

I've recently purchased a cross line laser for hanging paper. Since my purchase I've not had a chance to try this idea but figured it would be very useful in the scenario... get a nice plumb line straight into the corner and use as a guide to paint to.

Jack Pauhl said...

JDMcCann, Not really, I often try to clean up corners by patching. There are rounded corners, jagged, cracked, split and just plain poor workmanship. If you decide not to patch the corners you can re-cut both ways to lessen the two evils of the stray line. Cut it one way, for example in this post, cut light, cut dark, cut light again and clean up the dark again. You may only need to re-cut certain areas, mainly areas that stray on you. Seems odd to attempt a sharp cut on a corner that isn’t. I’m not sure even if you get it clean that it will look right.

If you are set on this approach in the beginning you can cut lightly to help speed up the drying process.

JDMcCann said...

Thanks mate

Patching isn't an option either to be honest. The work we do is repair work for insurance companies. We're given a scope of works that we cannot veer from. We're merely there to put the house back to the way it was the insurance companies tell us.

The way you've mentioned has always been the way I've done it.

More I think about it the more I think you're right regarding whether it'd look odd or not.